Where U.S. coronavirus cases are on the rise

State of the outbreak

Tracking coronavirus vaccinations and outbreaks in the U.S.

New cases of COVID-19 in the United States fell for a fourth week in a row, dropping 17% last week to just under 290,000, the lowest weekly total since September, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county data.

Deaths from COVID-19 fell 1.3% to 4,756 in the week ended May 9, the fewest deaths in a week since July.

More than a third of the country’s population has been fully vaccinated as of Sunday, and 46% has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The rate of vaccinations, however, has been slowing for three straight weeks. In the past seven days, an average of 2 million vaccine doses were administered per day, which is down 17% from the previous week and represents the biggest percentage drop reported under the Biden administration.

Vaccine doses given
New cases
 
New deaths
 
Currently hospitalized
 

Only seven out of 50 states reported week-over-week increases in new cases, mostly rising by less than 10%.

Michigan still led the nation in new cases per capita, though that was down 23% from the previous week, according to the Reuters analysis. New cases also fell in Puerto Rico and Colorado, the areas with the next highest rates of infection based on population.

The lowest rates of infection based on population were in Oklahoma, California and Mississippi.

The average number of COVID-19 patients in hospitals fell 9%, the second weekly drop in a row.

Editor’s note
As of July 27, reports of COVID-19 cases and deaths are sourced to Reuters reporting in order to streamline data reconciliation efforts when discrepancies arise. Testing data continues to come from The COVID Tracking Project.

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Vaccines
Cases
Deaths
Hospitals

Share of population who have been vaccinated

As of

At least one dose
Fully vaccinated

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Where the highest share of the population has been vaccinated

Most recent data as of

Weekly reported cases per 100,000 population

As of Sunday each week, March 1, 2020 to

New cases
Where cases have risen for 2+ weeks

Sources: Local state agencies, local media and Reuters research

Where cases increased the most in the last week

For the week ending Sunday,

Weekly reported deaths per 100,000 population

As of Sunday each week, March 1, 2020 to

New deaths
Where deaths have risen for 2+ weeks

Sources: Local state agencies, local media and Reuters research

Where deaths increased the most in the last week

For the week ending Sunday,

Average number of people in hospitals each week per 100,000 population

As of Sunday each week, March 1, 2020 to

In hospital (weekly avg. per 100K)

Sources: Local state agencies, local media and Reuters research; Data prior to August 1, 2020 is from The COVID Tracking Project

Where the number of people in hospitals increased the most in the last week

For the week ending Sunday,

About the data: On March 1, 2021, this page stopped using new hospitalization and testing data from The COVID Tracking Project in anticipation of that project’s end. The hospitalization data shown here was collected by Reuters after August 1, 2020. The previous data comes from The COVID Tracking Project’s archives.

The vaccination data comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Reuters collates and checks this data by hand and the figures largely come from state, county and territory government/public health department websites. Reuters also occasionally sources information from press conferences, press releases and verified tweets and social media posts by state officials. While some states and counties report fresh numbers daily, others only update on weekdays or less frequently.

Reuters’ total cases and deaths include both confirmed and probable cases and deaths where data is available. If probable cases and deaths are not reported, only confirmed cases and deaths are shown.

On April 7, 2021, Oklahoma reported 1,716 new deaths that occurred between August and February that had gone unreported due to an error by a lab.

A change in reporting methodology in Iowa on Feb. 19 resulted in a one-time increase of over 27,000 new cases.

A spike observed in deaths in Ohio and nationally in early February 2021 is due to Ohio including 4,275 probable deaths from earlier in the pandemic.

A spike observed in deaths in Indiana and nationally in early February 2021 is due to Indiana including over 1,500 probable deaths from earlier in the pandemic.

Missouri cases and deaths for the week ended Jan. 31 include a one-time increase due to Reuters including data reported by St. Louis County.

Texas began reporting probable cases on Dec. 11. The change resulted in a one-day increase of roughly 65,000 cases.

On Sept. 2, Massachusetts adopted a more restrictive definition for probable cases, which resulted in a significant fall in the number of cases. Reuters has reconciled all historical data to reflect this change in methodology

Virginia reported a large backlog of positive infections on Aug. 7, resulting in an abnormal spike in cases.

On July 30, Minnesota began reporting the total number of people tested instead of total specimens tested. This changed the state total by more than 173,000 tests for July 31.

A spike observed in deaths in New Jersey and nationally in late June is due to New Jersey including over 1,800 probable deaths from earlier in the pandemic.

Wyoming’s spike in late April is due to the inclusion of probable cases.

New cases in Alabama more than doubled to 7,787 in late March but this included a backlog.

Reporting by Roshan Abraham, Shaina Ahluwalia, Kavya B, Christine Chan, Chaithra J, Anurag Maan, Sangameswaran S and Lisa Shumaker,

Sources: Vaccination data is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Deaths, cases and hospitalization data is from state and local governments, health authorities and Reuters reporting; Hospitalization data prior to August 1, 2020 is from The COVID Tracking Project

Editing by Tiffany Wu