The scale of coronavirus deaths

The scale of coronavirus deaths

U.S. fatalities from COVID-19 surpassed 150,000 on Wednesday, according to a Reuters tally, another grim milestone for the global pandemic that has claimed the lives of over 650,000 people globally.


A 61-year-old man in Wuhan, China, dies from a respiratory illness believed to be caused by the new virus.

A second person, a 69-year-old man, dies in Wuhan, China.

More than 300 coronavirus patients have now died. All in China.

A 39-year-old dies in Hong Kong, the first COVID-19 death reported outside mainland China.

France reports its first death as the virus makes its way west. This is still only the second death outside mainland China.

Deaths pass 3,000, according to a Reuters tally. Most of these are in mainland China but many other countries start to report deaths, including Iran, Italy, South Korea and Japan.

Total deaths pass 10,000 and daily fatalities climb above a thousand for the first time. Deaths start to mount in Iran, France, Spain and Italy, all dealing with major outbreaks and deaths in the hundreds per day.

Now deaths are climbing by the thousands each day. By the end of March, more than 42,000 have lost their lives worldwide. The U.S. and Britain are now among the countries with surging death tolls.

Only 10 days later, that death toll more than doubles to over 100,000 worldwide according to a Reuters tally. Many of the recent fatalities are in the U.S.

Death tolls continue to grow with fatalities reported in 165 countries so far.

Eight days later, the death toll rises by another 50,000. During that week, more than 6,000 people die each day

Global deaths exceed the quarter-million mark, most of which are in Europe.

After another three weeks, almost 100,000 deaths are added to the total.

Deaths continue to climb at a rate of around 4,000 per day.

The global tally surpasses the half-million mark. Here’s what that looks like when stacked together.

Worldwide coronavirus deaths stand at more than 650,000. The U.S. death toll hits 150,000, making it the country with the most deaths by far.

The stacks of caskets visualised here would reach 12 metres tall, the height of a four-story building. This is just one of 13 rows that would be created by the more than 650,000 COVID fatalities to date.

Cases surging

After less than six months, the total number of deaths linked to COVID-19 surpassed the number of people who die annually from malaria, one of the most deadly infectious diseases.

Almost one-quarter of all the deaths so far have been in the United States, though fatalities in Brazil, Mexico and India are rising rapidly, a Reuters tally shows.

Latin America is leading the world in new coronavirus cases, for the first time this week surpassing the combined infections in the United States and Canada. This is mainly due to the outbreak in Brazil, which is the second largest in the world.

Almost 40 countries have reported record single-day increases in coronavirus infections over the past week, around double the number that did so the previous week, according to a Reuters tally showing a pick-up in the pandemic in every region of the world.

A surge in cases usually precedes a rise in deaths by a couple of weeks.

Reported deaths as of July 29, 2020

Around 450,000 of all the deaths are in these eight countries. That’s around seven out of ten fatalities.

Spain

28,436

Rest of the world 203,182

France

30,209

India

33,425

Italy

35,123

Mexico

44,876

UK

45,878

Brazil

88,539

The U.S. accounts for around 23% of the world’s COVID-19 deaths with 149,745

Spain

28,436

Rest of the world 203,182

France

30,209

India

33,425

Italy

35,123

Mexico

44,876

UK

45,878

The U.S. accounts for around 23% of the world’s COVID-19 deaths with 149,745

Spain

28,436

Rest of the world 203,182

France

30,209

India

33,425

Italy

35,123

Mexico

44,876

UK

45,878

Brazil

88,539

The U.S. accounts for around 23% of the world’s COVID-19 deaths with 149,745

Spain

28,436

France

30,209

India

33,425

Rest of the world 203,182

Italy

35,123

Mexico

44,876

UK

45,878

Brazil

88,539

The U.S. accounts for around 23% of the world’s COVID-19 deaths with 149,745

Spain

28,436

France

30,209

India

33,425

Rest of the world 203,182

Italy

35,123

Mexico

44,876

UK

45,878

Brazil

88,539

The U.S. accounts for around 23% of the world’s COVID-19 deaths with 149,745

The World Health Organization says that the United States, Brazil and India can still get on top of the pandemic. They are “powerful, able, democratic countries who have tremendous internal capacities to deal with this disease”, Dr. Mike Ryan, head of the WHO emergencies programme, told a Geneva briefing recently.

Note:

Calculations based on casket size of 180cm length, 62cm height, 70cm width

Sources:

Local state agencies; Local media; Reuters Research

By:

Marco Hernandez and Simon Scarr | REUTERS GRAPHICS

Editing by:

Lisa Shumaker